Man Law: Rules of Engagement

1) Never flirt or holler at your boys girlfriend/FWB. A man shouldn’t feel like he cant bring his girlfriend around his boy because you can’t respect what they have. Your loyalty is to your boy. At no point should you be trying to reach out to her via text or call, facebook, e-mail, whatever…

2) If your boys girlfriend/FWB tries to make a move on you, you are required to fuck her immediately. This is the ONLY time this is acceptable. If she is willing to do it with you then she is willing to do it with someone else. By fucking her, you are preventing your boy from having to find out that his girls a hoe in a more fucked up situation

3) If you fuck her then you are to tell your boy immediately. This gives you the opportunity to show your boy what kind of woman he’s with. If you keep it a secret so that you can go behind your boys back later to do it again, you are violating rule #1 and not respecting your boy.

K.Flay - Can’t Sleep

My mother told me that the world has got its plans
I wanna hold em til they burn right through my hands
Don’t ask me questions cause I’m tired of confessing
And I know that it’s not much to say but I swear that I’d like to change

“Some people buy a ticket and they walk into a bar and they watch and they drink a few drinks. They watch a band play. They don’t remember that those musicians that are on stage…. they don’t have a home like you do.. if you have a home. So the next time you’re in a bar and there’s only three people there and the bands playing, I hope you remember that because those musicians on stage… once you decide to be a musician and go on tour and play all over the place, you dont have a home any more. Bonnaroo people always say ‘Bonnaroo festival started with the hippies. The hippies started this festival.’ Just give credit to the people that don’t have a home. That’s all I’m trying to say”
— Jack White 

Kendrick Lamar - Faith (ft. BJ The Chicago Kid & Punch)

This for my people that stressing whenever times is hard
Your mind’s slipping, wondering, “Is there really a God?
Knowing you shouldn’t think that way and trying to freeze your brain
But whenever there’s pain, that feeling forever remains
We can’t believe what we can’t see and reality seems stronger than prayer
Cause you tried to change your life, and now you live in a wheelchair
And your son was born with cancer and he live in urgent care
At the tender age of 12, and you feel that no one cares
Searching for answers, that’s human nature, you ain’t in the wrong
Just know when you feeling that way spirit’s in the room
I watched people I know pray and catch the Holy Ghost
And wonder why I ain’t ever caught that feeling before
Maybe they know Him better, or I don’t know no better
But what I do know, is that He’s real and He lives forever
So the next time you feel like your world’s about to end
I hope you studied because He’s testing your faith again


I’d rather not live like there isn’t a God
Than die and find out there really is
Think about it
justcallmesushi:

"We’re learning a lot about this thing called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. This war time disease. This combat fatigue diagnosis. And we read something worth sharing. Fact, urban youth are twice as likely to get Post Traumatic Stress Disorder than soldiers who are coming home from war. So tell me, what’s the difference between homicide in the streets and bloodshed on the battlefields of Iraq. […] The only difference there is between a soldier with PTSD and one of my students with it is that a soldier gets to leave the battlefield, while my kids go home to it."
Javon Johnson & Terisa Siagatonu- “PTSD”
justcallmesushi:

"We’re learning a lot about this thing called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. This war time disease. This combat fatigue diagnosis. And we read something worth sharing. Fact, urban youth are twice as likely to get Post Traumatic Stress Disorder than soldiers who are coming home from war. So tell me, what’s the difference between homicide in the streets and bloodshed on the battlefields of Iraq. […] The only difference there is between a soldier with PTSD and one of my students with it is that a soldier gets to leave the battlefield, while my kids go home to it."
Javon Johnson & Terisa Siagatonu- “PTSD”
justcallmesushi:

"We’re learning a lot about this thing called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. This war time disease. This combat fatigue diagnosis. And we read something worth sharing. Fact, urban youth are twice as likely to get Post Traumatic Stress Disorder than soldiers who are coming home from war. So tell me, what’s the difference between homicide in the streets and bloodshed on the battlefields of Iraq. […] The only difference there is between a soldier with PTSD and one of my students with it is that a soldier gets to leave the battlefield, while my kids go home to it."
Javon Johnson & Terisa Siagatonu- “PTSD”
justcallmesushi:

"We’re learning a lot about this thing called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. This war time disease. This combat fatigue diagnosis. And we read something worth sharing. Fact, urban youth are twice as likely to get Post Traumatic Stress Disorder than soldiers who are coming home from war. So tell me, what’s the difference between homicide in the streets and bloodshed on the battlefields of Iraq. […] The only difference there is between a soldier with PTSD and one of my students with it is that a soldier gets to leave the battlefield, while my kids go home to it."
Javon Johnson & Terisa Siagatonu- “PTSD”
justcallmesushi:

"We’re learning a lot about this thing called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. This war time disease. This combat fatigue diagnosis. And we read something worth sharing. Fact, urban youth are twice as likely to get Post Traumatic Stress Disorder than soldiers who are coming home from war. So tell me, what’s the difference between homicide in the streets and bloodshed on the battlefields of Iraq. […] The only difference there is between a soldier with PTSD and one of my students with it is that a soldier gets to leave the battlefield, while my kids go home to it."
Javon Johnson & Terisa Siagatonu- “PTSD”
justcallmesushi:

"We’re learning a lot about this thing called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. This war time disease. This combat fatigue diagnosis. And we read something worth sharing. Fact, urban youth are twice as likely to get Post Traumatic Stress Disorder than soldiers who are coming home from war. So tell me, what’s the difference between homicide in the streets and bloodshed on the battlefields of Iraq. […] The only difference there is between a soldier with PTSD and one of my students with it is that a soldier gets to leave the battlefield, while my kids go home to it."
Javon Johnson & Terisa Siagatonu- “PTSD”
justcallmesushi:

"We’re learning a lot about this thing called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. This war time disease. This combat fatigue diagnosis. And we read something worth sharing. Fact, urban youth are twice as likely to get Post Traumatic Stress Disorder than soldiers who are coming home from war. So tell me, what’s the difference between homicide in the streets and bloodshed on the battlefields of Iraq. […] The only difference there is between a soldier with PTSD and one of my students with it is that a soldier gets to leave the battlefield, while my kids go home to it."
Javon Johnson & Terisa Siagatonu- “PTSD”

justcallmesushi:

"We’re learning a lot about this thing called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. This war time disease. This combat fatigue diagnosis. And we read something worth sharing. Fact, urban youth are twice as likely to get Post Traumatic Stress Disorder than soldiers who are coming home from war. So tell me, what’s the difference between homicide in the streets and bloodshed on the battlefields of Iraq. […] The only difference there is between a soldier with PTSD and one of my students with it is that a soldier gets to leave the battlefield, while my kids go home to it."

Javon Johnson & Terisa Siagatonu- “PTSD”

(via juicyj-caint)

Texts with Hakim

  • Kim: Brian is picking you up to come to the studio?
  • Me: Yeah, when he gets off of work.
  • Kim: For sure, we have to get a lot done today. Are you sleeping over? I think Brian is.
  • Me: Yeah :-)
  • Me: No smiley, my bad.
  • Me: That looked mad suspect. Why the fuck did they put a smiley key next to the enter key?

Chance The Rapper - Acid Rain

Sometimes the truth don’t rhyme
Sometime the lies get millions of views
Funerals for little girls, is that appealing to you?
From your cubicle desktop, what a beautiful view
I think love is beautiful, too
Building forts from broken dams, what a hoover could do
For future hoopers dead from Rugers shooting through the empty alley
Could’ve threw him an alley-oop, helping him do good in school
Damn that acid burn when it clean ya
I still miss being a senior
And performing at all those open mic events
High schools, eyes closed seeing arenas
And I still get jealous of Vic
And Vic’s still jealous of me
But if you touch my brother
All that anti-violence shit goes out the window along with you
And the rest of your team
Smoking cigarettes to look cooler
I only stop by to look through ya
And I’m only getting greedier
And I’m still Mr. Youmedia
And I still can’t find Talent
And I’m still choosing classmates that wouldn’t fuck
Mom still thinks I should go back to school
And Justin still thinks I’m good enough
And Mama Jan still don’t take her meds
And I still be asking God to show his face
And I still be asking God to show his face

nipple piercings? more like… nibble piercings 

theprosaicmoments:

teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED
I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!
Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!
Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  
And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway
An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.
Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.

WABI-SABI
kintsugi originating late 15th century theprosaicmoments:

teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED
I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!
Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!
Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  
And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway
An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.
Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.

WABI-SABI
kintsugi originating late 15th century theprosaicmoments:

teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED
I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!
Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!
Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  
And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway
An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.
Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.

WABI-SABI
kintsugi originating late 15th century theprosaicmoments:

teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED
I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!
Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!
Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  
And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway
An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.
Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.

WABI-SABI
kintsugi originating late 15th century theprosaicmoments:

teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED
I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!
Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!
Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  
And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway
An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.
Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.

WABI-SABI
kintsugi originating late 15th century theprosaicmoments:

teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED
I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!
Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!
Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  
And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway
An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.
Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.

WABI-SABI
kintsugi originating late 15th century theprosaicmoments:

teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED
I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!
Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!
Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  
And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway
An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.
Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.

WABI-SABI
kintsugi originating late 15th century

theprosaicmoments:

teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED

I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!

Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!

Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  

And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway

An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.

Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.

WABI-SABI

kintsugi originating late 15th century

(via venus-in-blurs)